A new Nobuyoshi Araki retrospective opens this month in New York. The controversial Japanese photographer - better known for his works focusing on the bondage style named kinbaku-bi - presents a variety of subjects over the past 50 years, including his honeymoon with his wife Yoko and her deterioration as she succumbed to ovarian cancer. The result is an immense body of work that explores intimacy, sentimentality and mortality. From the shockingly intimate details of everyday life to elaborately staged erotica.


The exhibition ‘The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life, and Death in the Work of Nobuyoshi Araki’ will take place at Museum of Sex until 31 August (233 Fifth Avenue, New York), introducing around 150 prints, 500 polaroids and 400 books, plus commentary from his collaborators, muses, critics, fans and fellow photographers. “I want to make photographs that maintain their incompleteness”, says Nobuyoshi Araki, also called an artist, diarist and pornographer for his complex exploration of love, death and sex. “I don't want them to lose their reality, presence, speed, heat, or humidity. Therefore, I stop and shoot before they become refined or sophisticated.”


The exhibition is co-curated by Maggie Mustard, a Riggio Fellow in Art History and expert on Post-War Japanese Photography alongside Mark Snyder, Director of Exhibitions at the Museum of Sex. Don't miss the chance to see Araki’s deeply loving marriage with his wife Yōko and the lustful nightlife of the Tokyo underbelly. Here's life, love and sex are always tinged by an inevitable mortality.

Haikure The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life and Death.
Haikure The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life and Death.
Haikure The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life and Death.
Haikure The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life and Death.
Haikure The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life and Death.
Haikure The Incomplete Araki: Sex, Life and Death.

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